Re-Presenting Art
water-stained:

Elaine de Kooning, Spring, 1965. Watercolor and gouache on paper.

water-stained:

Elaine de Kooning, Spring, 1965. Watercolor and gouache on paper.

water-stained:

Nanha (India), The Emperor Shah Jahan with his Son Dara Shikoh, folio from the Shah Jahan Album, c. 1620. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. [zoomable image]

water-stained:

Nanha (India), The Emperor Shah Jahan with his Son Dara Shikoh, folio from the Shah Jahan Album, c. 1620. Ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. [zoomable image]

water-stained:

Haley Tompkins

Optical Research, 2009. Found object and gouache.

Shadow Clock III, 2009. Wood, watercolor, and watch.

Tele and Data VI, 2009. Found object and gouache.

water-stained:

Roni Horn
Tiger, Tiger, 1984. Gouache with polymer varnish.

water-stained:

Roni Horn

Tiger, Tiger, 1984. Gouache with polymer varnish.

water-stained:

Roni Horn
Gurgles, Sucks, Echoes, 1992. Gouache and watercolor.

water-stained:

Roni Horn

Gurgles, Sucks, Echoes, 1992. Gouache and watercolor.

water-stained:

Yun-Fei Ji

Mistaking Each Other for Ghosts, 2007

The Dead Can Still Dance, 2006

Relocation, 2008

pacegallery:

Museum Monday: Organized by the Outdoor Advertising Association of America and various museum directors nationwide, Art Everywhere is a public art project slated to begin this summer. As Carol Vogel discusses in a recent New York Times article, the project will involve “images by dozens of famous American artists…[and] 50,000 displays from electronic billboards to bus shelters, an initiative by leading museums and the billboard industry to create one of the largest outdoor art exhibitions seen in the country.” 

Beginning today and continuing through May 7, the public can vote for their favorite artworks among 100 selections at ArtEverywhereUS.org

Pictured above are short-listed works by artists who are represented by Pace Gallery: Mark Rothko's White Center (1957) from LACMA; Chuck Close's Phil (1969) from the Whitney Museum; Willem de Kooning's Excavation (1950) from the Art Institute of Chicago; de Kooning's Montauk Highway (1958) from LACMA; and Elizabeth Murray's Children Meeting (1978) from the Whitney Museum.

Read more from the New York Times here. Cast your Art Everywhere vote here.

water-stained:

Anne Chu

Landscape, 1999.

Figure Self-Portrait, 2002.

Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

mewnette:

Untitled II, 2005 
Chris Ofili

mewnette:

Untitled II, 2005 

Chris Ofili

(via water-stained)

explore-blog:

Agnes Martin on art, happiness, pride, and failure – a rare and wonderful 1976 interview with the iconic, reclusive artist.

explore-blog:

Agnes Martin on art, happiness, pride, and failure – a rare and wonderful 1976 interview with the iconic, reclusive artist.

archivesofamericanart:

Meet Toshiko Takaezu: a potter who (like all potters) was not afraid to play with fire. In our oral history interview with her, she reflects on why she became a potter:

…the impact that I got from women potters, the strength that you could feel, the strength that is in the pot, made me feel that I really like this…and to have such an impression that I got from the pottery that the women made and the force that they had with the piece, and they didn’t make to have it in the galleries and the museum, they make because they can use it.

- Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu, 2003 June 16
Original, un-gif-ed image:
Toshiko Takaezu throwing a ceramic pot, 1974 / Evon Streetman, photographer. Toshiko Takaezu papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

archivesofamericanart:

Meet Toshiko Takaezu: a potter who (like all potters) was not afraid to play with fire. In our oral history interview with her, she reflects on why she became a potter:

…the impact that I got from women potters, the strength that you could feel, the strength that is in the pot, made me feel that I really like this…and to have such an impression that I got from the pottery that the women made and the force that they had with the piece, and they didn’t make to have it in the galleries and the museum, they make because they can use it.

- Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu, 2003 June 16

Original, un-gif-ed image:

Toshiko Takaezu throwing a ceramic pot, 1974 / Evon Streetman, photographer. Toshiko Takaezu papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

(via coolchicksfromhistory)

nybg:

hahamagartconnect:

SPOTLIGHT: KEHINDE WILEY

American Artist, Kehinde Wiley's work is a colorful blend of traditional and contemporary roots seen in his trademark over sized portraits where young men of color, posed in their street clothes are fixed into grandiose backgrounds that suit them as if they were royalty. Initially his portraits were based on the photographs of young men in Harlem, now he has firmly situated himself as the painter known to travel to urban places in Israel, Africa, Brazil and India to find his next subject…

Come join us on hahamag.com & Twitter to finish the conversation and learn some fun facts about Wiley.

I’m just all about these. S’all. —MN

museumgifs:

James Van Der Zee

museumgifs:

James Van Der Zee

elespleendeparis:

Lavinia Fontana (1552 - 1614): Bianca degli Utili Maselli con sus hijos.

elespleendeparis:

Lavinia Fontana (1552 - 1614): Bianca degli Utili Maselli con sus hijos.